You’re less likely to develop liver cancer (see above). It also works well to reduce your chances of colorectal cancer. People who drink 4-5 cups (24 – 30 oz.) of black coffee a day have a 15% lower risk of colorectal cancer, and a 40% lower risk of liver cancer. And since liver and colorectal are the cancers responsible for the 3rd and 4th most deaths in the world, this is rather impactful. Coffee also reduces your risk for skin cancer, particularly in women, by about 20%.
South Indian Coffee, also known as Mysore Filter Coffee or Kaapi (South Indian phonetic rendering of "coffee') is a sweet milky coffee made from dark roasted coffee beans (70%–80%) and chicory (20%–30%), especially popular in the southern states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. The most commonly used coffee beans are Koffeey Arabica (Coffee Arabica grown from Arehalli Village) Peaberry (preferred), Arabica, Malabar and Robusta grown in the hills of Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagaluru), Kerala (Malabar region) and Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal).[citation needed]
Of course, you could just cut down on the alcohol intake. From the Archives of Internal Medicine (link). Another more recent study also showed coffee’s liver protecting benefits. link. Yet another study showed that both coffee and decaffeinated coffee lowered the liver enzyme levels of coffee drinkers. This study was published in the Hepatology Journal.

Find some coffee that features elements you enjoy in your coffee additives- What is it that you like about the things you doctor up your coffee with? Look for a coffee the highlights those things. Coffee can be sweet, fruity, creamy or a multitude of other things. Decide what you like about a particular additive and adjust your buying habits accordingly. You may need to do some research here but there are many resources (talk to your local roaster). The subscription service Misto Box, has you work directly with a curator who tries to find coffee you like and adapts to your feedback on past shipments.

South Indian Coffee, also known as Mysore Filter Coffee or Kaapi (South Indian phonetic rendering of "coffee') is a sweet milky coffee made from dark roasted coffee beans (70%–80%) and chicory (20%–30%), especially popular in the southern states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. The most commonly used coffee beans are Koffeey Arabica (Coffee Arabica grown from Arehalli Village) Peaberry (preferred), Arabica, Malabar and Robusta grown in the hills of Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagaluru), Kerala (Malabar region) and Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal).[citation needed]


I’m a bit of a coffee aficionado myself. I used to drink my coffee black but then got pregnant with The Stinky, and I couldn’t handle it black anymore. I’m also a fellow Paleo and I LOVE coconut milk (from the can) in my coffee, with a sprinkle of cinnamon and a drop of vanilla extract. It tastes like my beloved Vanilla lattes and you eventually trick yourself into thinking you’re drinking sugar. I call it a “Summer Latte”. You should try it sometime.

This article has inspired me. I’m having a devil of a time leaving the half and half out of my coffee. After reading this, it would seem that all things are possible..even changes with my half and half. So, tomorrow I’m going to try 1 tablespoon half and half, and 1 tablespoon 2% milk. Plan to do this for 3 weeks, and then re-evaluate. Thanks for the inspiration!!
I don’t have a problem with people adding things to their coffee (my wife enjoys her coffee with cream and minimal disapproving head shakes from me) but I do think black coffee has its merits. It is my opinion that the vast majority of coffee additives are remnants from the first wave coffee notion that coffee is vile, caffeine is good and adding things to coffee makes it tolerable.
Summer is the perfect season to experiment with more exotic flavors, and this meal can help you do just that. To make cilantro and lime chicken, you will need to combine some simple ingredients such as lime, jalapeno peppers, fresh cilantro, and salsa. The result is chicken that is super tender and that you’ll want to make over and over again, so get the recipe here.

Kelsey Casselbury is a freelance writer and editor based in central Maryland. Her clients have included Livestrong, School Nutrition magazine, What's Up? Media, American Academy of Clinical Chemistry, SmartBrief and more. She has a formal education in personal training/nutrition and a bachelor's degree in journalism from The Pennsylvania State University.
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