South Indian Coffee, also known as Mysore Filter Coffee or Kaapi (South Indian phonetic rendering of "coffee') is a sweet milky coffee made from dark roasted coffee beans (70%–80%) and chicory (20%–30%), especially popular in the southern states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. The most commonly used coffee beans are Koffeey Arabica (Coffee Arabica grown from Arehalli Village) Peaberry (preferred), Arabica, Malabar and Robusta grown in the hills of Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagaluru), Kerala (Malabar region) and Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal).[citation needed]

A French press, also known as a press pot, coffee press, coffee plunger, cafetière (UK) or cafetière à piston, is a coffee brewing device patented by Italian designer Attilio Calimani in 1929.[5] A French press requires coffee of a coarser grind than does a drip brew coffee filter, as finer grounds will seep through the press filter and into the coffee.[6]
Regular coffee (slow brewed as with a filter or cafetière) is sometimes combined with espresso to increase either the intensity of the flavour or the caffeine content.[44] This may be called a variety of names, most commonly "red eye,"[45] "shot in the dark,"[46][47] and "depth charge" – though this last is a federally registered trademark of a company, Caribou Coffee, so its usage is restricted.[48] Coffeehouse chains may have their own names, such as "turbo" at Dunkin' Donuts.[49] A double shot of espresso in the coffee may be termed a "black eye," and a triple shot a "dead eye." "Caffè Tobio" is a version with an equal amount of coffee to espresso.[50]

Liver is one of the most vital organs of our body as it performs so many important functions. And did you know your liver loves black coffee? Black coffee helps prevent liver cancer, hepatitis, fatty liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis. People who drink 4 or more cups of black coffee everyday have 80 per cent lower chances of developing any liver disease. Coffee helps by lowering the level of harmful liver enzymes in the blood.


So it’s Jan 2 2018 and I’m finally ready to try to get to liking black coffee! I haven’t used sugar in 20 years but every time I taste a sip of black coffee I run for the creamer (either 1/2 and 1/2 or HWC if I’m doing keto, on that note I’ll even add butter) BUT I for some reason have made this my 2018 challenge (2016 was blue cheese – success! , 2017 – avacado – mainly success except eating in wedges ) now it’s black coffee!!!! Wish me luck I’m going to need it 😊

Espresso is very strong black coffee that is drank from a small cup. The best kinds of coffee blends for espresso creation are the dark roast aromatic beans from Latin America, although this is still subject for debate among coffee lovers. Espresso is created by subjecting the beans to high-pressure steam treatment. The characteristic feature of espresso is the creamy foam on the top and the strong aroma. Espresso is meant as a pick-me-up drink rather than for leisurely drinking.
Coffee contains ingredients that both lower your blood sugar and increase your resting metabolic rate, reducing your risk for diabetes. Additionally, nutrients in coffee help your body use insulin, a hormone necessary to use and store sugar you get from food. Substantial coffee drinkers, of either regular or decaffeinated coffee, could be half as likely to develop diabetes than those who drink little to no coffee. The association between coffee intake and diabetes proposes that each cup of coffee you drink per day, could result in a 7 percent reduction in your risk for developing diabetes.
Caffeine might also offer some calorie-burning benefits that help your weight-loss efforts, but it's too early to say for sure. One laboratory study, published in Food & Function in 2012, found that caffeine boosted thermogenesis — a phenomenon that helps you burn more calories. And a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2009 found that caffeine also boosted thermogenesis in people, although this study was small and included only seven test subjects.
Drinking more coffee is linked to a lower risk of depression, according to a review of 26 studies published in Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry in 2016. For each cup of coffee consumed per day, the risk of depression decreased by 8 percent, the researchers found. However, it's worth noting that too much caffeine can cause problems in people who also suffer from anxiety, negating any beneficial effects the coffee can have on depression risk.
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