South Indian Coffee, also known as Mysore Filter Coffee or Kaapi (South Indian phonetic rendering of "coffee') is a sweet milky coffee made from dark roasted coffee beans (70%–80%) and chicory (20%–30%), especially popular in the southern states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. The most commonly used coffee beans are Koffeey Arabica (Coffee Arabica grown from Arehalli Village) Peaberry (preferred), Arabica, Malabar and Robusta grown in the hills of Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagaluru), Kerala (Malabar region) and Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal).[citation needed]
Coffee offers a wealth of health benefits — there's its well-known ability to temporarily boost concentration and alertness, and drinking coffee might also lower your risk of liver disease and type 2 diabetes, explains the Linus Pauling Institute. Black coffee is a healthier alternative to coffee flavored with calorie-laden cream and sugar, and it might also help you lose weight. Just make sure you don't overdo it — too much caffeine can have negative health effects.

While the health benefits of coffee are still a debated topic; it is a generally accepted fact that a cup of black coffee is an insignificant calorie contribution. It isn’t a diet buster. Adding cream or sugar (the verdict is already in on how bad sugar is for you by-the-way) to your coffee takes a neutral (possibly healthy) drink and turns it into something with calories and thus something that should be evaluated. Drinking two to three cups of black coffee a day is not usually considered to be a problem, however, drinking two to three cups of a milky, sugary coffee drink a day is a habit most would consider unhealthy.
A liqueur coffee, as its name suggests, is a coffee brew with a 25 ml shot of liqueur. This brew is usually served in a clear liqueur coffee glass with the coffee and cream separated for visual and taste effect. The liqueur of choice is added first with a teaspoon of sugar mixed in. The glass is then filled to within an inch of the top with filtered coffee. Slightly whipped cream may then be poured over the back of a spoon, so that it floats on top of the coffee and liqueur mixture. The sugar is required in the coffee mixture to help the cream float.[citation needed]
Decaffeinated coffee grew in popularity over the last half of the 20th century, mainly due to health concerns that arose regarding the over-consumption of caffeine.[55][56][57] Decaffeinated coffee, sometimes known as "decaf," may be drunk as regular brewed coffee, instant, espresso, or as a mix of regular caffeine beans and decaffeinated beans.[58][59]
Straight ristrettos—shots that are traditionally drunk from a demitasse and not diluted into a larger cup containing milk or water—could be described as bolder, fuller, with more body, and less bitterness, but with a higher concentration of acidity. These characteristics are usually attributed to espresso in general but are more pronounced in a ristretto. Diluted into a cup of water (to make an Americano or long black) or milk (e.g. latte and cappuccino), ristrettos are less bitter and exhibit a more intense espresso character.[43]
Caffeine might also offer some calorie-burning benefits that help your weight-loss efforts, but it's too early to say for sure. One laboratory study, published in Food & Function in 2012, found that caffeine boosted thermogenesis — a phenomenon that helps you burn more calories. And a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2009 found that caffeine also boosted thermogenesis in people, although this study was small and included only seven test subjects.
Consuming black coffee right after having meal will give the benefits for weight loss. It is possible since drinking coffee after meal will give a sense of fullness, the same feeling when we eat dessert for dinner. However, dessert is commonly made of something sweet and fatty like cheese cake and brownies. Therefore, replacing desert with black coffee is the delicious solution to your weight loss diet.
It probably took a month (possibly longer) for me to even be able to tolerate black coffee. I would make a face every single sip I took, but after time, I acquired a taste for it, and now I enjoy it. I look forward to my morning brew as I once did with all the additives. Not saying once in a blue moon I won’t add a little something, but that is usually if I brew a cup in the early evening just for the comfort, but that is few and far in between anymore.
Kelsey Casselbury is a freelance writer and editor based in central Maryland. Her clients have included Livestrong, School Nutrition magazine, What's Up? Media, American Academy of Clinical Chemistry, SmartBrief and more. She has a formal education in personal training/nutrition and a bachelor's degree in journalism from The Pennsylvania State University.
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