A report from the International Journal of Obesity, published in 2010, noted that thermogenic compounds — like caffeine — might work better in some people than in others, or they might only work effectively under some circumstances. So while there's some potential for the caffeine in coffee to help you lose weight, you shouldn't count on coffee alone as a weight-loss strategy, at least until more research has been done.
Drinking coffee without adding sugar can reduce the chances of heart disease and inflammation, thereby lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease [5] . Studies have shown that coffee consumption lowers the risk of stroke by 20 per cent [6] , [7] , [8] . However, coffee may cause a slight increase in blood pressure, which doesn't cause a problem though.

A 28-year study, eventually published in 2017 in Alzheimer's and Dementia, the journal of the Alzheimer's Association, determined that four to five cups of a coffee a day – a level deemed "moderate" – led to a decreased risk of dementia during that time period. Those who drank coffee in moderate levels had less medial temporal atrophy, which is linked to Alzheimer's disease, compared to those who drank three or fewer cups a day, including those who didn't drink any.
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