10 years ago I stopped using sugar, I found it took a long time to get used to the taste of my coffee without sugar and I was expecting it to be the same trying to switch to black coffee. I know it’s only my first cup of black coffee but I actually like it more than I do with milk. So much so that I was motivated to leave this post. More simple, much better.
You’re less likely to develop liver cancer (see above). It also works well to reduce your chances of colorectal cancer. People who drink 4-5 cups (24 – 30 oz.) of black coffee a day have a 15% lower risk of colorectal cancer, and a 40% lower risk of liver cancer. And since liver and colorectal are the cancers responsible for the 3rd and 4th most deaths in the world, this is rather impactful. Coffee also reduces your risk for skin cancer, particularly in women, by about 20%.

Coffee’s a diuretic. This means drinking coffee will make you urinate more frequently than if you didn’t drink coffee. This is a good thing in most cases because it keeps your system cleansed. The human body often flushes out harmful bacteria and viruses this way, and drinking coffee enhances this natural process. Through this, black coffee drinkers become sick far less often.
Affogato: This is a term that literally means 'drowned'. It is the description of a shot of separately served espresso that is later poured over a the top of a scoop of vanilla ice cream or gelato. This beverage is usually served in a short drink glass and is a Italian desert favourite. Popular Affogatos include Vanilla Affogato, Mocha Affogato, and Peppermint Affogato.

Cortado: means "cut" in Spanish so the double shot espresso served in a demetesse glass supported with a metal handle is "cut" with an equal part of hot milk, making it in between the size and strength of a macchiato and a cappuccino. It is popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as throughout Latin America and Cuba, where it is drunk in the afternoon. Variations include more froth on top than a traditional cortado and occasionally with different names such as Piccolo or Gibraltar. Thanks to Ryan Cerbus for the entry.


Kelsey Casselbury is a freelance writer and editor based in central Maryland. Her clients have included Livestrong, School Nutrition magazine, What's Up? Media, American Academy of Clinical Chemistry, SmartBrief and more. She has a formal education in personal training/nutrition and a bachelor's degree in journalism from The Pennsylvania State University.
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