Unlike drinking alcohol every day, drinking black coffee actually improves your liver. It’s been shown that people who drink four or more cups of coffee a day (24+ oz., or two “Tall” cups from Starbucks) have as much as an 80% lower rate of cirrhosis of the liver. People who drink this same amount also have as much as a 40% lower rate of developing liver cancer.
A French press, also known as a press pot, coffee press, coffee plunger, cafetière (UK) or cafetière à piston, is a coffee brewing device patented by Italian designer Attilio Calimani in 1929.[5] A French press requires coffee of a coarser grind than does a drip brew coffee filter, as finer grounds will seep through the press filter and into the coffee.[6]
Cold brew coffee originated in Japan, where it has been a traditional method of coffee brewing for centuries.[11] Slow-drip cold brew, also known as Kyoto-style, or as Dutch coffee in East Asia (after the name of coffee essences brought to Asia by the Dutch),[12] refers to a process in which water is dripped through coffee grounds at room temperature over the course of many hours.[13] Cold brew can be infused with nitrogen to make nitro cold brew coffee.
The kinds of coffee are technically divided into three, according to where they came from and the variety of the beans used to make the brew. The basic kinds of coffee are: one-origin, one-estate and blends. When coffee originates from one land and all the beans have a common flavour, this is called one-estate coffee. The one-origin kinds of coffee are made from a mixture of beans harvested in a the region but from different estates. Blend coffee types are the most popular kind. Different kinds of beans from different estates and regions are mixed together to obtain a unique taste. It’s safe to say that most of the coffee varieties we know and love are blends.
Change your mug color– This is a somewhat obscure suggestion, but a year or so ago a small study concluded that mug color could have an impact on how we taste our coffee. Specifically, using a white mug instead of a clear mug can make you perceive a coffee as more bitter and less sweet. If you regularly drink coffee out of a white mug, try changing it up and using a clear mug instead.
Don’t you know that drinking black coffee is powerful for your nervous system performance? It is able to stimulate the nervous system which gives command to break down fat during the metabolism process and convert them into energy. This is the reason why black coffee can improve our workout performance which is good for your effort to lose weight. In addition, black coffee will also activate the nervous system to release dopamine and serotonin, hormones which help you to feel happy and fights against depression.
Unlike drinking alcohol every day, drinking black coffee actually improves your liver. It’s been shown that people who drink four or more cups of coffee a day (24+ oz., or two “Tall” cups from Starbucks) have as much as an 80% lower rate of cirrhosis of the liver. People who drink this same amount also have as much as a 40% lower rate of developing liver cancer.

You made a good point that clicked for me. I used to like my coffee very bold BUT then I added tons of stevia and half and half to mask the taste. Now, I’m starting to drink my coffee black (day 2 – eeek) and your comment made me realize that I don’t actually enjoy bitter tasting coffee – if I did I wouldn’t be adding sweeteners. Thanks, I’m going to try a weaker blend. :)
So I’m doing Keto and intermittent fasting so I’m trying to make the switch. I’ve gone to a Guatamalian lightly freshly roasted coffee; burr ground by hand just before I pour the water over the grounds and wait 45 sec to let it bloom; then pouring the rest of the water through it. I’m still finding it too bitter. I used 6 tablespoons for ~ 3, 8 oz cups. Should I try and adjust my grind, or the amount of coffee I add to the water to try and tamp down the strong bitter taste?
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