Longevity: Greek boiled coffee linked to longevity and heart health. –link. Another study published in the June 17, 2008, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that women who consume coffee had a lower risk of death from cancer, heart disease, and other factors, which therefore promotes a longer lifespan. Yet another study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that coffee drinkers were at less risk of dying prematurely from diseases like diabetes, heart disease and forms of cancer. Study link. Another study from Japan found that men who drink at least 3 cups of coffee per day have a 24% less risk of dying early from disease. Yet another study from Harvard also confirmed that those who drink 1-5 cups of coffee a day avoid diseases linked to premature death. The study. A Japanese-based study also found similar results when it comes to coffee and longevity. The study. Two more 2017 research studies have confirmed what earlier studies have found. Those that drink coffee live longer than those who don’t. The American study is found here and the European-based study is found here.
Cortado: means "cut" in Spanish so the double shot espresso served in a demetesse glass supported with a metal handle is "cut" with an equal part of hot milk, making it in between the size and strength of a macchiato and a cappuccino. It is popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as throughout Latin America and Cuba, where it is drunk in the afternoon. Variations include more froth on top than a traditional cortado and occasionally with different names such as Piccolo or Gibraltar. Thanks to Ryan Cerbus for the entry.
Those who drink coffee regularly have a 20% less risk for stroke, and generally have lower rates of heart disease. As caffeine increases your heart rate, coffee is actually good for cardiovascular health. Drinking a few cups of coffee a day has a similar effect to going for a walk, which keeps your heart healthier. Please do not use this as an excuse to not exercise, though. It doesn’t work quite that well.

So I’m doing Keto and intermittent fasting so I’m trying to make the switch. I’ve gone to a Guatamalian lightly freshly roasted coffee; burr ground by hand just before I pour the water over the grounds and wait 45 sec to let it bloom; then pouring the rest of the water through it. I’m still finding it too bitter. I used 6 tablespoons for ~ 3, 8 oz cups. Should I try and adjust my grind, or the amount of coffee I add to the water to try and tamp down the strong bitter taste?


I don’t have a problem with people adding things to their coffee (my wife enjoys her coffee with cream and minimal disapproving head shakes from me) but I do think black coffee has its merits. It is my opinion that the vast majority of coffee additives are remnants from the first wave coffee notion that coffee is vile, caffeine is good and adding things to coffee makes it tolerable.
The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson, Joy Dubost, claims that based on the amount of coffee consumed by Americans, it is one of the greatest sources of antioxidants their diet. In addition to antioxidants, coffee contains the essential nutrients chromium, potassium, niacin, vitamin E and magnesium. Coffee consumption alone can supply up to 8 percent of your chromium needs. Chromium plays a role in controlling your blood sugar and possibly lowering your LDL, or bad cholesterol. Much like tea, coffee contains plant chemical compounds, particularly flavonoids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of chronic disease.
Drinking more coffee is linked to a lower risk of depression, according to a review of 26 studies published in Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry in 2016. For each cup of coffee consumed per day, the risk of depression decreased by 8 percent, the researchers found. However, it's worth noting that too much caffeine can cause problems in people who also suffer from anxiety, negating any beneficial effects the coffee can have on depression risk.
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