Moka coffee is coffee brewed with a moka pot, a stovetop coffee maker which produces coffee by passing hot water pressurized by steam through ground coffee at a lower pressure than an espresso maker. The moka pot is an Italian invention, first produced by Bialetti in the early 1930s. The flavor of moka pot coffee depends greatly on bean variety, roast level, fineness of grind, and the level of heat used. Due to the higher-than-atmospheric pressure involved, the mixture of water and steam reaches temperatures well above 100 °C, causing a more efficient extraction of caffeine and flavors from the grounds, and resulting in a stronger brew than that obtained by drip brewing.[citation needed]
Despite some great eating out options today, nothing beats the pleasure of a good home cooked meal 'Ghar ka khana'. But deciding what to cook and what to eat everyday is definitely not easy. Our mission is keeping families at home and around the dining table. Our community is primarily driven by home cooks across the country who share their recipes from traditional family classics to their very own inventions. We encourage all food lovers to post their own recipes, as well as discover those made by other home chefs.

Affogato: This is a term that literally means 'drowned'. It is the description of a shot of separately served espresso that is later poured over a the top of a scoop of vanilla ice cream or gelato. This beverage is usually served in a short drink glass and is a Italian desert favourite. Popular Affogatos include Vanilla Affogato, Mocha Affogato, and Peppermint Affogato.
Hammerhead: A coffee drink only served in the USA. It is an American term for a shot of espresso in a coffee cup that is topped up with drip-filtered coffee. As Kris Rosvold explains in the comments: In Oregon, the hammerhead is usually known as a red eye and uses 2 shots of espresso topped up in a 16oz travel mug with drip coffee. It's also sometimes called a "shot in the dark".

Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is the best known ingredient of coffee. Its beneficial effects on the human body has been researched quite well, but coffee as a whole is a complex beverage with a thousand different substances. Some studies argue that decaf and caffeinated coffee may have the same health effects and suggest that it’s not the caffeine that is responsible for most of coffee's health benefits.


Caffè crema (Italian: cream coffee) refers to two different coffee drinks:[39] an old name for espresso (the 1940s and 1950s), and a long espresso drink primarily served in Germany, Switzerland and Austria and northern Italy (the 1980s onwards), along the Italian/ Swiss and Italian/ Austrian border.[40] As a term, it generally means "espresso", while in technical discussions, referring to the long drink, it may more narrowly be referred to as Swiss caffè crema. Variant terms include "crema caffè" and the hyperforeignism "café crema" – "café" is French, while "caffè" and "crema" are Italian, thus "café crema" mixes French and Italian.

Cortado: means "cut" in Spanish so the double shot espresso served in a demetesse glass supported with a metal handle is "cut" with an equal part of hot milk, making it in between the size and strength of a macchiato and a cappuccino. It is popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as throughout Latin America and Cuba, where it is drunk in the afternoon. Variations include more froth on top than a traditional cortado and occasionally with different names such as Piccolo or Gibraltar. Thanks to Ryan Cerbus for the entry.


My mom's been a long-time lover of coffee. I can still remember her sending me up to the counter for her usual when I was a kid. “Double-tall nonfat extra hot latte with extra foam, no whip.” We lived in the coffee-loving city of Seattle before coffee was uber chic, and I like to think I inherited some of my mom's refined cafe preferences. But the fact remains that at 20-something years old, I still hadn't figured out how to make black coffee that didn't taste like mud to me. So I snooped around her kitchen when we were up to visit last weekend to see how she does it. “What's this coffee brand on your counter, mom? Gevalia?”
Taste the coffee black every time before adding cream or sugar- Before you add things to your coffee take a moment to taste it black. Don’t just take a sip, TASTE it. Think about what flavors you are getting out of your coffee and what you like and don’t like. If possible set a little black coffee to the side to taste again once it has cooled to room temperature. You will be surprised how much more pronounced the flavors are once the coffee has cooled a bit.
So, how if you feel bored with the original black coffee? If you really want add something to your coffee, you can add the low calorie sweetener and low fat milk. You can also add soya milk instead of fatty dairy milk. In addition, you better choose the light or medium roasted coffee bean, since the dark roasted coffee bean may not give enough substance needed to burn fats. The chlorogenic acid may damage during the heating process of dark roasted beans.

Black coffee is said to contain 0 calories and consuming it on an empty stomach can reduce weight as it stimulates the metabolic activity. It also reduces the fat cells when consumed after a meal. This is due to the presence of antioxidants and chlorogenic acids which enable weight loss. This particular acid happens to be present in black coffee which is also a rich source of caffeine. It plays a role in the absorption of glucose into the blood stream; this reduces the absorption of fat.


Measure what you are putting into your coffee- If you are brewing your coffee manually, I recommend the process of weighing or measuring the water and the coffee for your recipe. Your additives should be no different. Measure the cream and sugar you put into your coffee. This will get you consistent results through the whole process, brewing to drinking. It would be a shame to meticulously weigh and brew your coffee only to haphazardly eyeball the amount of cream or sugar you add. It is better to be consistent. Measuring your additives will also serve the purpose of showing you exactly how much cream and sugar you are consuming.
Coffee offers a wealth of health benefits — there's its well-known ability to temporarily boost concentration and alertness, and drinking coffee might also lower your risk of liver disease and type 2 diabetes, explains the Linus Pauling Institute. Black coffee is a healthier alternative to coffee flavored with calorie-laden cream and sugar, and it might also help you lose weight. Just make sure you don't overdo it — too much caffeine can have negative health effects.
Espresso is brewed by using an espresso machine to force a small amount of nearly boiling water and steam – about 86 to 95 °C (187 to 203 °F) – under pressure through finely ground and compacted coffee.[21][22] The espresso machine was patented in 1901 from an earlier 1884 machine,[23][24] and developed in Italy; with the invention of the Gaggia machine, espresso spread in popularity to the UK in the 1950s where it was more often drunk with milk as cappuccino due to the influence of the British milk bars,[25][26][27] then America in the 1980s where again it was mainly drunk with milk,[28] and then via coffeehouse chains it spread worldwide.[3] Espresso is generally denser than coffee brewed by other methods, having a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids; it generally has a creamy foam on top termed "crema".[29] Espresso is the base for a number of other coffee drinks, such as latte, cappuccino, macchiato, mocha, and Americano.[30]
Because the ground coffee beans in cold-brewed coffee never come into contact with heated water, the process of leaching flavor from the beans produces a chemical profile different from conventional brewing methods.[14][15] Coffee beans contain a number of constituent parts that are more soluble at higher temperatures, such as caffeine, oils and fatty acids. Brewing at a lower temperature results in lower acidity and lower caffeine content when brewed in equal volume.[16][17] It is around 65 to 70 percent less acidic than hot drip coffee or espresso, per part.[14] Although less caffeine is extracted with the cold brew method, a higher coffee-to-water ratio is often used, between 2 and 2 1/2 times. This may compensate for this difference in solubility, resulting in a brew with equal, if not more, caffeine (although this is unlikely).[17][18]

Drinking black coffee daily helps to reduce the risk of diabetes which in later age can lead to organ damage and heart diseases. It was seen people who drank 2 or less cups of coffee had increased risk of diabetes. Coffee helps in controlling diabetes by increasing insulin production. Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee help in prevention of diabetes.
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