As usual, an excellent and well-argued article. I spent 20 years making coffee I didn’t like and putting milk in it to turn it into coffee I did like (I kicked the sugar habit over 25 years ago, realising it was seriously bad for my health). It’s only in the last few years, and through writing the Coffee Spot , that I’ve discovered that I can make coffee I like without having to put anything in it.
Of course, you could just cut down on the alcohol intake. From the Archives of Internal Medicine (link). Another more recent study also showed coffee’s liver protecting benefits. link. Yet another study showed that both coffee and decaffeinated coffee lowered the liver enzyme levels of coffee drinkers. This study was published in the Hepatology Journal.
Again, it's the caffeine working here. Your recommended maximum amount of caffeine is 400 milligrams, roughly the amount that you’ll get from 4 cups of coffee. If you’re caffeine-sensitive, be careful with coffee. You are probably already aware what amount and what kind of coffee suits, or doesn't suit you. The amount of caffeine that is safe for human consumption is actually written in our DNA.
The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson, Joy Dubost, claims that based on the amount of coffee consumed by Americans, it is one of the greatest sources of antioxidants their diet. In addition to antioxidants, coffee contains the essential nutrients chromium, potassium, niacin, vitamin E and magnesium. Coffee consumption alone can supply up to 8 percent of your chromium needs. Chromium plays a role in controlling your blood sugar and possibly lowering your LDL, or bad cholesterol. Much like tea, coffee contains plant chemical compounds, particularly flavonoids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of chronic disease.

Cortado: means "cut" in Spanish so the double shot espresso served in a demetesse glass supported with a metal handle is "cut" with an equal part of hot milk, making it in between the size and strength of a macchiato and a cappuccino. It is popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as throughout Latin America and Cuba, where it is drunk in the afternoon. Variations include more froth on top than a traditional cortado and occasionally with different names such as Piccolo or Gibraltar. Thanks to Ryan Cerbus for the entry.

Black coffee may be bitter, but its health benefits are sweet. Coffee is full of nutrients like antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals that improve overall health, brain function, and may even help prevent diseases. Many of these health benefits are due to caffeine, a natural stimulant. Read on to learn our favorite 5 Benefits of Drinking Black Coffee!
Good news to all those coffee lovers out there: That cup of joe has quite a few health benefits, as long as you don't load it up with cream and sugar. A number of health organizations agree: The World Health Organization in June 2016 took coffee off the list of potentially carcinogenic foods, stating that java possibly protects again certain cancers, while the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee declared that three to five cups of coffee a day can be part of a healthy dietary pattern. In fact, research shows that black coffee can have a positive effect on conditions including diabetes, dementia and depression.
×