Besides the ability to protect our body from free radical that is the main factor of aging and many harmful diseases, antioxidant can also help you succeed your weight loss program. Antioxidant contained in the coffee is just like the antioxidant contained in the vegetables and fruit  such as mentioned in Health Benefits of Starfruit and Health Benefits of Mangosteen Peel which are able to help the metabolism and the calorie burning.
Arabica coffee, which accounts for about three-quarters of the coffee cultivated worldwide, is grown throughout Latin America, Central and East Africa, India and, to some extent, Indonesia. Robusta coffee is grown in West and Central Africa, throughout South-East Asia and, to some extent, in Brazil. These are only two of the many kinds of coffee grown all over the world.

Because the ground coffee beans in cold-brewed coffee never come into contact with heated water, the process of leaching flavor from the beans produces a chemical profile different from conventional brewing methods.[14][15] Coffee beans contain a number of constituent parts that are more soluble at higher temperatures, such as caffeine, oils and fatty acids. Brewing at a lower temperature results in lower acidity and lower caffeine content when brewed in equal volume.[16][17] It is around 65 to 70 percent less acidic than hot drip coffee or espresso, per part.[14] Although less caffeine is extracted with the cold brew method, a higher coffee-to-water ratio is often used, between 2 and 2 1/2 times. This may compensate for this difference in solubility, resulting in a brew with equal, if not more, caffeine (although this is unlikely).[17][18]


Coffee has a bad reputation as an unhealthy drink, but it has lots of interesting attributes which help improve your health by: -acting as a painkiller after workouts, or to ease hangovers -increasing your fiber intake -protecting your liver against unhealthy alcohol intake -lowering your risk of type-2 diabetes, Alzheimers, suicide and depression -strengthening your DNA, and -reducing your risk of cancer.
Arabica coffee, which accounts for about three-quarters of the coffee cultivated worldwide, is grown throughout Latin America, Central and East Africa, India and, to some extent, Indonesia. Robusta coffee is grown in West and Central Africa, throughout South-East Asia and, to some extent, in Brazil. These are only two of the many kinds of coffee grown all over the world.
Too much work pressure and tension can lead to depression and stress which in turn can cause many serious health issues. But having a black cup of coffee when you feel tensed or low can boost your mood instantly and make things better. Coffee stimulates the central nervous system and increases the production of dopamine, serotonin, and noradrenaline, important neurotransmitters that elevate the mood.

If you drink your coffee black, you have less to keep track of for your morning pick-me-up. I enjoy my coffee whether there is cream in the fridge and sugar in the pantry or not. Someone who enjoys additives in their coffee cannot enjoy a cup of coffee if those elements are missing and therefore they are at a disadvantage. In the same vein, whether camping or traveling it is one (or two) less things you have to worry about bringing when making coffee on the go.
Brewing a perfect cup of black coffee is an art. Although drinking it without sugar, milk or cream can be an acquired taste; it allows the brewer to focus on the full-bodied flavor of freshly roasted coffee beans. Black coffee is generally made in a pot, although modern coffee connoisseurs may insist on mastering the pour-over method for the best possible flavor.
Coffee offers a wealth of health benefits — there's its well-known ability to temporarily boost concentration and alertness, and drinking coffee might also lower your risk of liver disease and type 2 diabetes, explains the Linus Pauling Institute. Black coffee is a healthier alternative to coffee flavored with calorie-laden cream and sugar, and it might also help you lose weight. Just make sure you don't overdo it — too much caffeine can have negative health effects.
Kelsey Casselbury is a freelance writer and editor based in central Maryland. Her clients have included Livestrong, School Nutrition magazine, What's Up? Media, American Academy of Clinical Chemistry, SmartBrief and more. She has a formal education in personal training/nutrition and a bachelor's degree in journalism from The Pennsylvania State University.
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