Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' spokeswoman and registered dietitian Joan Salge Blake says she considers increased cognitive function to be one of coffee's healthiest perks. A study published in the "American Journal of Epidemiology" in 2002 found that current coffee consumption, as well lifetime caffeine use, may be correlated to better performance on cognitive tests among women. For men, coffee consumption is linked to slower cognitive decline. Overall, coffee may reduce both cognitive and motor deficiency associated with aging.

Try different brewing methods and recipes- It is possible that part of the reason you feel your coffee needs cream or sugar is the way you are brewing it. You may need to adjust your dosage, grind size or pick a new brewing method altogether. I recommend going to a coffee shop that is known for its slow bar and talking to the barista about what they recommend based on your preferences. They can not only help you find a coffee you like, they should also be able to represent that coffee to you brewed properly so you can experience the coffee as intended.
Yuenyeung (drink) is a popular drink in Hong Kong, made of a mixture of coffee and Hong Kong-style milk tea. It was originally served at dai pai dangs (open space food vendors) and cha chaan tengs (cafe), but is now available in various types of restaurants. It can be served hot or cold. The name yuanyang, which refers to mandarin ducks, is a symbol of conjugal love in Chinese culture, as the birds usually appear in pairs and the male and female look very different. This same connotation of "pair" of two unlike items is used to name this drink.[citation needed]
Asian chicken lettuce wraps are sweet, slightly salty and very easy to make. All you need to do is add the chicken, red bell pepper, carrots, soy sauce, honey, garlic and the other ingredients to your crockpot and let them cook. You can also replace the chicken with beef or turkey if you like. The presence of different flavors gives this meal a summer flavor you are sure to love. Learn how to make this meal here.
Straight ristrettos—shots that are traditionally drunk from a demitasse and not diluted into a larger cup containing milk or water—could be described as bolder, fuller, with more body, and less bitterness, but with a higher concentration of acidity. These characteristics are usually attributed to espresso in general but are more pronounced in a ristretto. Diluted into a cup of water (to make an Americano or long black) or milk (e.g. latte and cappuccino), ristrettos are less bitter and exhibit a more intense espresso character.[43]
Cuban tradition is to drink coffee strong and sweet, often mixing the sugar with the coffee beans before brewing. The traditional method of brewing coffee was a filter method using a cloth cone; this has mostly been replaced with an aluminium cafetera or coffeemaker—in tourist areas some cafés will have an espresso machine, though espresso machines are expensive, so espresso is not a common drink for most Cubans.[31][32] Though quality coffee is grown in Cuba, it is expensive, so most Cubans drink coffee imported from Puerto Rico, and often mixed with ground peas.[33][34] The Cuban habit of brewing coffee with sugar has spread to Miami, West Palm Beach, Tampa and the Keys, in Florida, US, where espresso is the preferred brewing method and an espresso brewed with sugar is termed Café Cubano, Cuban coffee, Cuban espresso, cafecito, Cuban pull, or Cuban shot.[35] Sometimes demerara sugar is used, and sometimes the sugar (white or brown) is not brewed with the coffee, but is placed in the cup as the coffee is dripped into it, then stirred into a froth.[36][37] Variations on the Miami café Cubano are with a splash of milk - cortadito; and with steamed milk - café con leche.[38]
On my (now rare) trips to the coffeehouse, my baristas are so surprised to see me leaning towards the more gourmet/traditional drinks now rather than the frilly oversweetened stuff. Nate came home with my old favorite the other day and I was like, “Wooooah sugar overload!” Once in awhile I’ll have something special as a dessert now, but my tastebuds have changed quite a lot.
Those who drink coffee regularly have a 20% less risk for stroke, and generally have lower rates of heart disease. As caffeine increases your heart rate, coffee is actually good for cardiovascular health. Drinking a few cups of coffee a day has a similar effect to going for a walk, which keeps your heart healthier. Please do not use this as an excuse to not exercise, though. It doesn’t work quite that well.

Of course, you could just cut down on the alcohol intake. From the Archives of Internal Medicine (link). Another more recent study also showed coffee’s liver protecting benefits. link. Yet another study showed that both coffee and decaffeinated coffee lowered the liver enzyme levels of coffee drinkers. This study was published in the Hepatology Journal.
Instant coffee is great when you need a pick-me-up but don't have a coffee maker. Unlike ground coffee, instant coffee granules are made from dehydrated brewed coffee. Although this means you can't make the actual granules at home, instant coffee is still an easy, tasty way to get your caffeine fix! It's particularly great when iced, and you could get creative by adding spices, whipping up a fancy latte, or making a frosty coffee shake.
Thank you for the article! I am not a sugar girl, but I usually add at least a tbsp of almond creamer(has some sugar in it)… I have always liked creamy coffee.. I used to drink dairy cream with added sugar too and I got myself used to cutting that down.. Today was my first try at black coffee, because I was starting a 3 day cleanse & cant have the additives.. To my surprise I have taken it very well! I thought I would make faces or turn my nose up! But it’s not bad! I will be on the lookout for a coffee with notes I might enjoy! thanks again!!

A shot or small portion of unsweetened coffee, now usually made either using an espresso machine or a moka pot, but traditionally made using a cloth drip, usually served in cups made for the purpose, called "tazitas de pocillo." It is widely drunk in Latin America, usually as an afternoon or after-dinner coffee. The defining feature is the size, usually half to a quarter the size of the usual ~8 US fluid ounces (240 ml) coffee cups. There are a number of small-sized drinks that use tazitas de pocillo, including such sweetened varieties as café cubano and café cortado, but these are usually not called a pocillo; rather, the Spanish diminutive suffix "-ito" is usually added to the name of the drink wanted in a pocillo size cup. For example, a pocillo-sized cortado is usually called a cortadito.[citation needed]
Kelsey Casselbury is a freelance writer and editor based in central Maryland. Her clients have included Livestrong, School Nutrition magazine, What's Up? Media, American Academy of Clinical Chemistry, SmartBrief and more. She has a formal education in personal training/nutrition and a bachelor's degree in journalism from The Pennsylvania State University.
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