According to professor Achmad Subagio of the Research Institute of the University of Jember, drinking black coffee twice a day prevents the risk of Parkinson's disease because caffeine elevates the dopamine levels in the body. Parkinson's disease affects the brain's nerve cells that produce dopamine, a neurotransmitter responsible for transmitting signals between the nerve cells of the brain.

According to professor Achmad Subagio of the Research Institute of the University of Jember, drinking black coffee twice a day prevents the risk of Parkinson's disease because caffeine elevates the dopamine levels in the body. Parkinson's disease affects the brain's nerve cells that produce dopamine, a neurotransmitter responsible for transmitting signals between the nerve cells of the brain.


Decaffeinated coffee grew in popularity over the last half of the 20th century, mainly due to health concerns that arose regarding the over-consumption of caffeine.[55][56][57] Decaffeinated coffee, sometimes known as "decaf," may be drunk as regular brewed coffee, instant, espresso, or as a mix of regular caffeine beans and decaffeinated beans.[58][59]
Good news to all those coffee lovers out there: That cup of joe has quite a few health benefits, as long as you don't load it up with cream and sugar. A number of health organizations agree: The World Health Organization in June 2016 took coffee off the list of potentially carcinogenic foods, stating that java possibly protects again certain cancers, while the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee declared that three to five cups of coffee a day can be part of a healthy dietary pattern. In fact, research shows that black coffee can have a positive effect on conditions including diabetes, dementia and depression.
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