The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson, Joy Dubost, claims that based on the amount of coffee consumed by Americans, it is one of the greatest sources of antioxidants their diet. In addition to antioxidants, coffee contains the essential nutrients chromium, potassium, niacin, vitamin E and magnesium. Coffee consumption alone can supply up to 8 percent of your chromium needs. Chromium plays a role in controlling your blood sugar and possibly lowering your LDL, or bad cholesterol. Much like tea, coffee contains plant chemical compounds, particularly flavonoids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of chronic disease.
So it’s Jan 2 2018 and I’m finally ready to try to get to liking black coffee! I haven’t used sugar in 20 years but every time I taste a sip of black coffee I run for the creamer (either 1/2 and 1/2 or HWC if I’m doing keto, on that note I’ll even add butter) BUT I for some reason have made this my 2018 challenge (2016 was blue cheese – success! , 2017 – avacado – mainly success except eating in wedges ) now it’s black coffee!!!! Wish me luck I’m going to need it 😊

There's also some evidence linking coffee itself to weight loss and weight control. One study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology in 2015, studied the dietary habits of more than 93,000 people to look for patterns between coffee consumption and weight. The study authors observed that people who drank more coffee had a lower risk of obesity, as well as a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. A study with laboratory animals, published in Nutrition & Diabetes in 2014, found that mice that consumed coffee and were fed a high-fat diet gained weight more slowly than the mice that didn't drink coffee.


Too many of these and you might have to ‘just crash here, bro’, because this type of coffee is brewed with whiskey, sugar, and a thick layer of cream on the top – and isn’t readily available in New Zealand Café’s due to its alcohol content, they’re more often found in restaurants.  Be warned that trying to make this with scotch and instant coffee doesn’t work… trust us.
A 28-year study, eventually published in 2017 in Alzheimer's and Dementia, the journal of the Alzheimer's Association, determined that four to five cups of a coffee a day – a level deemed "moderate" – led to a decreased risk of dementia during that time period. Those who drank coffee in moderate levels had less medial temporal atrophy, which is linked to Alzheimer's disease, compared to those who drank three or fewer cups a day, including those who didn't drink any.
×